Construction & Development

Construction needs to avoid social value smokescreens

Social value can be up to 15 per cent of non-price assessments in construction tenders, but are the metrics genuine? If not, it’s a huge missed opportunity for this sector with so many multiplier effects in the economy.

Australia’s construction industry must unite around a cohesive strategy

I recently attended a conference in the UK that discussed future trends affecting the global construction industry, and what struck me was the stark lack of consensus, clarity and strategy we have in Australia around the future of our construction and engineering industry, compared with many other countries.

Time for New Zealand to cut emissions from its construction sector and get its quality up to scratch

In response to a recent report highlighting New Zealand’s problem with embodied carbon in construction, the head of a metal industry organisation Nick Collins has suggested carbon is only part of the story and that a wider approach is needed to clean up the construction industry, which includes a bigger role for the local metal manufacturing sector.

Why construction standards need to be free

Having to pay high cumulative prices to find out what the rules are for construction doesn’t make sense. It’s like getting a licence and then having to pay to access each of the road rules. One of the comments on this story since we first posted suggests it just might be unconstitutional. It certainly feels unjust.

Business man and woman playing wood jenga game blocks in office studio.

Building crisis: we need an injection of good evidence

Rectifying an information and evidence shortfall in the now widely cited building and construction crisis needs to be an important part of improving policy making and regulation. 

Richard Wynne at construction site with two men

Victoria tackles flammable cladding: safety “fix” or confidence trick?

 In July, Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews and the state’s minister for planning, Richard Wynne, trumpeted that $600 million would tackle Victoria’s high-rise cladding crisis. It was paraded as a safety solution for owners of affected buildings but the “fix” was a contemptible confidence trick.