Materials

plastic doll house

Can bio plastic play a role in the circular economy transition?

The Fifth Estate caught up with sustainable plastics expert Dr John Williams at the Australasian Waste & Recycling Expo in Sydney a year after he first flagged his company’s recyclable, biodegradable and non-toxic plastic in a Spinifex column.

cladding aluminium building

NSW imposes retrospective flammable cladding ban

Combustible aluminium composite cladding will be banned in NSW on the exteriors of multi-storey buildings, including residential buildings and public buildings over two storeys, from tomorrow.

PVC plastic pipe

The toxic face of PVC manufacturing exposed

The building design sector should be careful when selecting building and furnishing materials containing PVC, with a new report finding mercury, asbestos, PFAS chemicals and other hazardous substances in the footprint of some chlorine-based materials.

flammable cladding The Lacrosse, Melbourne

Victoria turns to EUA model to rectify flammable cladding crisis

Victoria will introduce a “world-first” financial mechanism to help residential building owners pay for urgent rectification works caused by the installation of non-conforming and non-compliant flammable cladding on high-rise apartment buildings in the state.

Brisbane river Queensland

Cladding and compliance scandal: the saga continues

While audits into cladding on high-rise buildings continue to deliver bad news, the long-awaited Shergold and Weir review of building regulations has thrown down the gauntlet to building ministers to step up and adopt a national approach to compliance and enforcement.

pouring concrete

Graphene “game-changer” means stronger, greener concrete

University of Exeter researchers have found a way to incorporate wonder material graphene into the traditional concrete production process, a move they say could revolutionise the construction industry and lead to a much greener, stronger and durable product.

Biochar derived from wood waste

Wood waste could find new home in concrete

Biochar derived from wood waste could make concrete buildings 20 per cent stronger and 50 per cent more impermeable to water, according to new research out of the National University of Singapore.