Environment

We used to have deep rivers and expansive wetlands – now we’ve got a water crisis

Water has been a topic at the top of mind all summer, but beyond the headlines around mismanagement of the Murray Darling, threats to the Great Artesian Basin, dramatic flood photos and Sydney desalination plant being switched on are some issues that cut to the crux of how we live in this country.

Hot enough yet? What this heat is doing to our health

Hot enough yet? What this heat is doing to our health

Public libraries are staying open longer to help communities deal with heat stress and we might need school shut downs as well and meanwhile we get a more sedentary lifestyle.

What’s stopping Australia from building smart cities

What’s stopping Australia from building smart cities

Governments across Australia, Asia and worldwide are jostling to design ‘smart cities’ that will cater for our growing population. We need to build smart cities to maintain livability, but what…

Selling swimmability to spark the urban river clean ups

Selling swimmability to spark urban river clean ups

Not all rivers are suitable for swimming – there are sharks and other flesh eating animals to contend with in some places – but the benefits of a healthy river range much further with improvements to the ecology, heat island effect and recreational opportunities

The latest on GRESB, LEED, WorldGBC, and the US plan for a new green deal, and daytime cleaners

The latest on GRESB, LEED, WorldGBC, and the US plan for a new green deal, and daytime cleaners

In the same week we’ve seen the Global Emissions Gap report ring alarm bells about the hastening of climate change impacts, we’ve also seen Sydney hit by another extreme storm event while to the north fire conditions the like of which have not been seen in Queensland are sending hundreds of people fleeing communities in Capricornia.

Alarm bells over the loss of the world’s lungs, in Brazil

Scientists are hitting the panic button over the recent election of new Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro, because it means around two-thirds of the Amazon rainforest are now under the control of a far-right anti-environmental regime.